/   Law Books /  

Contract Law Books

  

Contract Law Books

This section contains free e-books and guides on Contract Law, some of the resources in this section can be viewed online and some of them can be downloaded.

Principles of the law of contract

This book is an attempt to draw such an outline of the principles of the law of Contract as may be useful to students, and, perhaps, convenient to those who are engaged in the teaching of law. Author tried to show how a contract is made, what is needed to make it binding, what its effect is, how its terms are interpreted, and how it is discharged and comes to an end.

Author(s):

s 445Pages

Selected cases on the law of contracts

The purpose of this book is to furnish a compact and, at the same time, comprehensive selection of authoritative material for the study and discussion of the principles of the law of contract. The work is now designed primarily to be used alone as the basis of instruction, although it may also be used conveniently with lectures or a standard treatise.

Author(s):

s 804Pages

Advertisement

The Law of Contract in Singapore

This note covers the following topics: introduction, offer and acceptance, intention to create legal relations, terms of the contract, capacity to contract, privity of contract, discharge of contract ,mistake, misrepresentation, duress, undue influence and unconscionability, illegality and public policy, judicial remedies for breach of contract.

Author(s):

s NAPages

Practical concepts in Contract Law

A contract is a legally binding exchange of promises or agreement between parties that the law will enforce. Contract law is based on the Latin phrase pacta sunt servanda (literally, promises must be kept). Breach of a contract is recognised by the law and remedies can be provided. Almost everyone makes contracts everyday. Sometimes written contracts are required, e.g., when buying a house. However the vast majority of contracts can be and are made orally, like buying a law text book, or a coffee at a shop. Contract law can be classified, as is habitual in civil law systems, as part of a general law of obligations.

Author(s):

s 95Pages